Category Archives: Agriculture: Its a Heritage

National Ag Day

In 1973 National Agriculture Day was established to honor and recognize the hard working agriculturalists. Agriculture is one of the oldest practiced sciences in the world and is an ever evolving science. Agriculture has a large impact in our everyday lives; from the food we eat, the clothes on our backs, the houses we call home, and the money we exchange. As the agricultural industry continues to meet the demands of the global economy, it is important to teach the worldwide impact of agriculture.

We here at Bamert Seed Company would like to thank the scientists, conservationists, farmers, ranchers, and all those involved in the agricultural industry.

Dodge put out an advertisement a couple years ago, we believe this is a good way to thank all of those involved in agriculture.

Click the video below to see Dodge’s “So God Made a Farmer

So God Made a Farmer

 

 

 

Bamert Seed

 

Wales Manor Vineyard-Buffalograss

Imagine yourself at the top of a knoll of green grass overlooking the most breath taking view you have ever seen. To one side you have the pavilion where the lucky couple will be married and to the other the full lush vines permeating the air with their delicious aroma. The warm sun at your back illuminating the lush green glow of the Buffalograss at your feet; the aromatic smell of the vines enhanced by the suns warmth; every little detail a tantalizing tickle to your senses. It’s the perfect setting for that perfect day. It’s the majestic feeling that one would get at Wales Manor Vineyard.

Bamert Seed Company has had the privilege to work with the esteemed vineyard in their revegetation projects of lawns and between vine rows. Topgun Buffalograss was specifically chosen for this project because of its lush green apperance, drought tolerance, and low maintenance requirements. Topgun Buffalograss provided Wales Manor an aesthetic appeal and turf grass for their needs; whether it be an outdoor wine tasting, a wedding, or a concert. Since Topgun Buffalograss is one of the shortest growing Buffalograss, they were able to use it between the vine rows as it would not interfere with growth; but rather provide ground cover to help reduce soil erosion.

collage

Bamert Seed

by Gretchen Adams, M.S.

Research & Development

Research and development are an integral part of  a company’s growth. It is also something that we here at Bamert Seed Company work hard to improve every day. We are constantly thinking of new products that our customer base may need and the potential of those species to grow on our farms. We hand select specific species based on customer needs as well as evaluate current species. We evaluate the areas of growth habits, maintenance, and nutritional requirements. Like all research projects we evaluate these areas so that we cannot only apply it to a large scale of production but to be better able serve our customers and answer any questions they may have. We are a company that accepts change and we want to be better able to provide and keep up with those changes. It is our goal to supply high quality seed to our customers and help them with all of their needs. As Peter Morville pointed out “What we find changes who we become.”

R&D1

Bamert Seed

by Gretchen Adams, M.S.

Plant Material Centers

The history of the reclamation/native seed industry is one deeply rooted in necessity and has grown into an industry that today provides specialty seed for numerous industries. These industries include: erosion control projects, fire reclamation projects, oil and gas reclamation, wildlife habitat, landscaping, highway right-of-ways, transmission line right-of-ways, ranching, solar farm sod, and numerous government programs.

 

For 80+ years the reclamation/native seed industry has had USDA to thank for creating government funded Plant Material Centers [PMC] to evaluate, collect, propagate, and make available native seeds to commercial markets. PMCs are responsible for finding the plants that are well suited for specified eco-regions and begin propagating the seeds of those species into quantities that are economically feasible for the consumer. PMC plant releases are tried and true; therefore, when you need species for your area look to PMC releases for the best results.

 

USDA’s history of Planter Material Centers: The 1930s Dust Bowl taught us that plants play a critical role in the health of our environment. At that time, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) created a number of Soil Conservation Nurseries throughout the country to grow and distribute plants for the stabilization of severely eroding lands. Since the mid-1930s, this need for conservation plants has grown into the present day Plant Materials Program.

 

The Program was created in 1935 as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) Division of Nurseries. It later became the SCS Plant Materials Program and is known today as the NRCS Plant Materials Program.

 

The Program conducts its plant evaluation activities under the guiding philosophy of Dr. Franklin J. Crider, first head of the Plant Materials Section: “In most cases nature has evolved a plant for almost every growing condition.” These plants and the associated plant technologies are invaluable resources in the implementation of USDA conservation programs.

 

In 1934, the first Plant Materials Center was established in Tucson, Arizona, under the direction of F. J. Crider. The Tucson Plant Materials Center was built by the Bureau of Plant Industry, a Bureau within the US Department of Agriculture. Numerous Plant Materials Centers, originally called erosion nurseries, or erosion experiment stations were built by the Bureau across the nation in response to the devastation of the “Dust Bowl” era in the early 1930’s. At this same time another agency called the Soil Erosion Service, a temporary agency created in 1933 within the Department of the Interior, was also establishing nurseries to produce plants and seed for conservation demonstration projects.

 

The Soil Erosion Service was transferred to the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1935 and on April 27, 1935 Congress passed the Soil Conservation Act, creating the Soil Conservation Service (SCS). In 1935, USDA consolidated the Soil Erosion Service and the erosion nurseries and erosion experiment stations of the Bureau of Plant Industry into the new Soil Conservation Service.

 

The Tucson Plant Materials Center served as the headquarters for the Southwest which included facilities at Safford, Arizona and Shiprock, New Mexico. The Center was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/plantmaterials/about/history/

Retrieved from http://www.nrcs.usda.gov 4/3/14

Retrieved from http://www.nrcs.usda.gov 4/3/14

Rhett Kerby

by Rhett Kerby, M.S.

National Agriculture Day

Did you know that agriculture is more than just raising animals and crops? Agriculture is found in everyday items from beauty to opportunities. Agriculture plays a part in everyones lives, from city dwellers to the country folk. In Texas alone agriculture contributes to more than $100 billion to the economy each year. And that is not just farming and ranching but 1.8 million jobs ranging from journalism and advertising to commodity training. We as agriculturalist are involed in not only providing food, clothing, and shelter to the world. We are involved in environmental enchancements, education, and prosperity for the country and the world.

Check out the link below to learn more about Texas Agriculture.

http://texasagriculture.gov/culture/index.html

And don’t forget to thank an Agriculturalist!

 

Blog Post

 

Bamert Seed

by Gretchen Adams, M.S.

Who says native plants aren’t productive…

Bamert Seed Company’s Big Bluestem has been put to the test in North Carolina.  In cooperation with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Bamert’s Big Bluestem came to the forefront as the grass to have due to its high yielding capabilities and wildlife benefits.

In many areas producers are seeking alternatives to their introduced pastures.  Producers are primarily concerned with lowering the cost of inputs (namely fertilizer) while not sacrificing yield and quality.  Bamert’s Big Bluestem does exactly that.

The wildlife benefits to planting Bamert’s Big Bluestem are tremendous.  The big bluestem offers nesting cover for ground nesting birds while offering loafing cover for fawns.

Pictured here is Bamert’s Big Bluestem producing 130 5×4 round bales on 25 acres with exceptionally low input costs.

Rhett Kerby

by Rhett Kerby, M.S.

 

 

Rhett Kerby, MS
Sales and Marketing Manager
www.BamertSeed.com